Author Topic: sugar levels  (Read 305 times)

Judie P

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 677
sugar levels
« on: January 10, 2022, 11:25:20 AM »
I am trying to figure out if a Sjogren's flare can cause your sugar levels to rise. It seems okay two hours after eating, but it is anywhere from 112 to 135 in the morning.  My mouth has been dryer than usual, so I am wondering if it is my Sjogren's or diabetes?  I have gone to the doctor before and everything is fine, so I don't want to make a fool out of myself this time.  Any help out there?
Primary SJS, SS-A >8, fibromyalgia, neuropathy, asthma, Effexor, Vitamin D 1,000mg, magnesium, Motrin, Ayr Nasal Gel, Ayr nasal mist, Optique 1 eye drops

meirish

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 430
Re: sugar levels
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2022, 06:53:08 PM »
I am assuming you are a type 2 diabetic and take a pill. Type 1 diabetes you would need insulin. Also, the charts that indicate what our blood sugars should be in the morning usually are a little different when one is older. I became diabetic when I was 66 years old and went to classes on managing diabetes. I was put on Metformin 500 mgm 3 times a day.

The teacher for that diabetic class said that older people usually should have higher blood sugars in the morning especially as older people have a tendency to bottom out if their sugars start to get too low in the morning. Usually we should be 90 to 130 we were told. I think 130 is too high myself. I have a tendency to be around 120 sometimes but then I can be in the 90's the next time. Have to watch what I eat at bed time and be sure to eat a protein like cheese and crackers or peanut butter sandwich.

Sometimes I will get in the 70's 0r 80's at bedtime and it is because I have been so active that evening so I will eat a whole peanut butter sandwich. The other question I have for you is are you just checking your blood sugars because you want to and have no history of diabetes?  No matter whether you have diabetes or not doctors will check our AIC blood level to see where our sugar levels are at. This test will tell what the average blood sugar has been over a 3 month period and is figured a different way than regular blood sugars. Every doctor seems to have a level they want their individual patient to be at. It just depends on our body, diabetes numbers, etc.

I would just advise you to talk this over with your doctor to see what he suggests. Good luck. meirish
« Last Edit: January 10, 2022, 06:57:27 PM by meirish »

Judie P

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 677
Re: sugar levels
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2022, 11:38:56 AM »
Thanks, meirish.  I am going for an A1c test on Monday.  I have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes before, but the last two years (in December) I was 5.5 and then in 2020 I was 5.7.  That is fine, but I have gone as high as 5.9.  Still pre diabetic.  It is just lately I have been urinating more, drier in the mouth, and hungry after 1.5 - 2 hours.  It could be Sjogren's finally kicking in, but I am also having small infections, like something going on in my vagina, a huge blister on my leg from supposedly venous insufficiency, and mouth sores.  My blood kit is ranging from 112 to 125 in the morning before I eat or drink.  One morning it was 139 after a huge meal of carbs and sugar the night before.  I will be 71 in April.

Thanks for your help.  Judie P.

Primary SJS, SS-A >8, fibromyalgia, neuropathy, asthma, Effexor, Vitamin D 1,000mg, magnesium, Motrin, Ayr Nasal Gel, Ayr nasal mist, Optique 1 eye drops

meirish

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 430
Re: sugar levels
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2022, 07:00:21 PM »
Judi, I am not going to tell you that your bloods sugars are not that high, but I would guess that you would do well to have a class on diabetes that many clinics offer for their diabetes both type 1 and type 2.

Every doctor has a different idea of what peoples AIC should run and generally speaking the older we are the doctors don't want us to be too low especially if we are on oral medication or insulin. Older people can have a tendency to have their blood sugars go up or down more rapidly and have problems with too low or too high blood sugars.

The normal time to do a blood sugar is 2 hours or so after we have eaten. This is called a 2 hour post prandial blood sugar. The class I took several times said that older people should expect blood sugars to be no more than 160 to 180 at this time. It is normal to have a higher blood sugar after one eats and it takes a while for it to go back down.

Every one of us needs to learn just what our body does with these blood sugars. I am usually 90 to 130 in the morning and it varies a lot. I need it to be a little higher as I have the propensity to have lower blood sugars and not always know it. My blood sugars are always higher through out the morning and early afternoon and then sometimes at bed time they will be in the 70's or 80's. Not always dependent on what I eat. So I have to make sure I eat a big peanut butter sandwich at bedtime.

This is something we learn over the years when we are on medication and as we get older. I have only had 2 AICs over 7.0 and this is very common for older people. Normally I run around 6.2 to 6.4 and my doc says that is perfect for a woman of 78 years old as less apt to have a really low blood sugar. This last time I had a 5.3 AIC and it scared me to death. I have been considered an "in control" diabetic and there are times I eat too much ice cream and everything else. Like I said, we all have to learn about this and after going on medication things change a lot. Also, the amount of fluid we drink can change our blood sugars and our activity level really changes it.

It would be good for you to be checked out as you could very well be having blood sugar issues or autoimmune issues with the mouth sores, etc. The big blister on your foot can be from the venous insufficiency but would be very nice to get it healed up so you don't get infection. Hope these things can be resolved for you. The one thing we learn with autoimmune is that is pretty common to have a lot of different ailments going on at the same time to keep us busy and then all of a sudden things will be a little better for awhile. Take care and good luck. meirish

Deb 27

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 814
Re: sugar levels
« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2022, 01:53:17 PM »
Hi Judie,

A blood sugar from 100-125 fasting is the range for pre diabetes. Usually, they will also run an A1c at the time and if it's between 5.7-6.4, that's also pre diabetes. If your fasting goes to 126 and or your A1c goes to 6.5, that's the criteria for diagnosis of diabetes type 2.

I had pre diabetes for years. I found out when we got an A1c machine at work and when I checked mine, it was 6.0. My docs have never warned me that my fasting blood sugar was in the low 100's. After about 15 years of pre diabetes, I got full blown type 2.

If I could have tolerated metformin, it may have slowed the progression to type 2. Of course, exercise and diet can also slow progression and most doctors recommend that.  I did my absolute best. I swim for 7 months out of the year and kept a good diet. Many of us are limited with our joint issues and energy levels, so it can be tough. Swimming really helps my blood sugars.

A lot of clinics now have diabetes prevention classes as well as classes for people with diabetes. Also, you can visit with a dietician who is a certified diabetes educator.

Talk to your doctor, see what your A1c is and let us know what the doctor says.  Anything you can do to prevent diabetes, is well worth the effort.
Sjogrens and RA,  Morphea (skin scleroderma), Hashimoto's, 
Nexium, synthroid, HRT, plaquenil,  Restasis, Maxi-tears supplement, L-glutathionne, CoQ10, folate, trintillex,  multi vitamin. lisinopril.

Linda196

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5194
Re: sugar levels
« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2022, 05:54:34 PM »
There are also two situations, called "dawn phenomena" and "rebound hyperglycemia" which can occur in diabetics and pre-diabetics both. Occasionally even people with no diabetes related diagnoses can have these.

This is a pretty good article about them :
https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/11443-blood-sugar-hidden-causes-of-high-blood-sugar-levels-in-the-morning#:~:text=High%20blood%20sugar%20in%20the%20morning%20may%20be,result%20of%20a%20combination%20of%20natural%20body%20changes.
Please check out our home page at http://www.sjogrensworld.org/index.html {{INCLUDES A LINK TO AMAZON SHOPPING!!}}
; and live chat at https://kiwiirc.com/client/irc.dal.net/#SjogrensWorld