Author Topic: Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension  (Read 389 times)

lighthouse33

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Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension
« on: July 11, 2020, 09:36:32 AM »
I just had an echocardiogram this week. My pulmonologist says my RSVP is slightly elevated at 38. My last ech done a year ago showed an RSVP of 27.

She told me Sjogren’s can cause Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension. Said she would see me in a year. Do another echo and a breathing test. And, look at both tests to get a better results. And, decide whether to do a catherizatiion. It is the only way to diagnose PAH.

Does anyone have PAH. And, can anyone provide information about it.
Female
Primary Sjogren's, polyneuropathy, endomitriosis, dietary fructose intolerance
Plaquenil, Lyrica, Tramadal, Omeprazole, Fortical, fish oil, flaxseed oil, benefiber, centrum chewable mulitviitamin, caltrate chewable 600 D+minerals, WSN Nerve Support Formula, Align, Biotene Products

meirish

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Re: Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension
« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2020, 04:39:31 PM »
I don't know what much about it but I know that my hubby had that diagnosis in his latter years. Hopefully someone will come on and explain it to you. Linda196, a head honcho on this forum is very smart and knows a whole lot. I bet she will show up. She ight not be around for the weekend though. meirish

Maybe you could PM her also on the message site above.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2020, 04:41:21 PM by meirish »

Linda196

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Re: Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension
« Reply #2 on: July 12, 2020, 02:41:22 AM »
Meirish, you are very kind. I am, like you, another retired nurse, but my professional background does include some time in invasive cardiac ICU, so I may have seen this sort of thing more often.

PAH (pulmonary artery hypertension) is elevated pressure in the blood vessel carrying blood from the right ventricle of the heart to the lungs so it can be oxygenated. If the pressure is too high, it holds up the blood getting to the lungs, and as a result it lowers the amount of blood picking up oxygen, and starts a whole cycle of hypoxia, shortness of breath, and increased heart work requirement and heart stress which can in turn increase the pressure. The goal of reducing the right ventricle pressure is to make it easier for the heart to pump blood to pick up oxygen.

RVSP is a measurement of the Right ventricle systolic pressure, and with the Echo, it is a calculated value, not a direct measurement. For actual measurement, you would require the cardiac catheterization. As a calculation, there can be a degree of error, but usually not enough to change your reading from mid range mild elevation to either down to low or up to moderate.

The treatment is often treating any underlying causes, like left heart disease or chronic lung disease, and good old connective tissue disease; which, if they exist, are usually being addressed anyway. Some drugs and toxins can also cause or contribute, and in that case, use of those substances would have to be evaluated to see if they could be discontinued.

Early treatment of  PAH without underlying left heart disease or chronic lung disease is usually diuretics, anticoagulants, Digoxin and Oxygen if shortness of breath is an issue. Meanwhile, watch and wait is the usual approach, and your Pulmonologist seems to be doing a good job.
« Last Edit: July 12, 2020, 09:40:19 AM by Linda196 »
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meirish

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Re: Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension
« Reply #3 on: July 12, 2020, 03:33:05 PM »
Linda196, Thanks for that good explanation. I need to make a copy to put someplace??? so I can refresh my memory.....over and over again.lol meirish