Author Topic: How about my children's genetic predisposition?  (Read 2640 times)

wondering1

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How about my children's genetic predisposition?
« on: April 04, 2014, 07:17:10 AM »
Lots of AI disorders in my family. Should I take preventive measures with my children now re: diet/nutrition to hopefully help them avoid the genetic predisposition? Recommendations? Thanks in advance.

Carolina

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Re: How about my children's genetic predisposition?
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2014, 07:29:31 AM »
Diet and nutrition cannot affect your genes.  I'm sorry.

Hugs,  Elaine
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quietdynamics

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Re: How about my children's genetic predisposition?
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2014, 11:17:14 AM »
Diet and nutrition cannot affect your genes.  I'm sorry.

Hugs,  Elaine

Teach through example healthy diet, and to drink water, good sleep habits.

Then throw them out in the backyard and let them get exercise, play and dirty.. seriously.

If you get bored you can read up on the effects of over-sanitizing our kids.
They need to build up resistance early, not later. And not be pumped up with anti-antibiotics every-time they sneeze.

Plus..between mother and father, you never know which genes where passed.

Let's hope they got the best of the best.. :)

I would put together with all family .. a thorough family history.
I only recently learned some information myself by talking to cousins.. and my offspring are now in their early and mid 20's, 
« Last Edit: April 04, 2014, 12:14:29 PM by quietdynamics »
Sjogrens ANA 1:640; SS-A/B+; Fibro; IBS; Neuro symptoms,Thyroid Anti-bodies; Ocular Rosacea, Livedo reticularis,

"You can't have a positive life with a  negative mind"

gemini052377

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Re: How about my children's genetic predisposition?
« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2014, 08:34:35 PM »
Great ? Wondering 1 and equally great answer Quiet.

I do have a very strong, family hx of AI diseases. I have 4 children from 14 to 6. I am very concerned my flawed genetics have been passed and will be triggered in them. I definitely agree with allowing them to fight off "bugs and infections" where my hubby is quick to reach for Tylenol when there is a fever.

Over the last several months my youngest who is 6 will ask for water bc her "mouth is sweaty" and then guzzles it. I file it away in my mind, I would not wish this on my worst enemy.
Mary-Primary Sjogren' s, Hashimoto' s Auto Immune Thyroid, Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Reynauds, and busy mom of 4 kiddos :)

machenza

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Re: How about my children's genetic predisposition?
« Reply #4 on: April 04, 2014, 09:31:00 PM »
I so hope that my daughter got very little or as little as possible form me. However, I do not have a family with AI, I am the first.

Nellie

irish

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Re: How about my children's genetic predisposition?
« Reply #5 on: April 04, 2014, 10:38:06 PM »
We are all created equal and all start out thinking that life is perfect until, kabam!!!!  We did not know that this was in us anymore than our parents did. Back years ago people were just sick with various ailments and died. Now we get all this stuff and end up at the doctor hoping to find out what the heck is going on.

I was sick off and on from age 20 ands did not know that I had a bunch of AID lurking in the shadows. Turns out that without diagnosis I can identify the relatives who had the AID including my Mom and possibly my dad. My Dad's family was full of it and I had an Aunt who was a nurse also and she had to quit work because of her infections and weakness. Her old pictures show her with droopy eyes. She was hospitalized a lot and given shots of gamma globulin years ago to fight off the various infections she had. Lo and behold, here I come with my low T-cells and myasthenia gravis. History of bad thyroid disease also in the family plus colitis, M.S. Etc.

Hubby and I had 3 boys not knowing that we would pass this stuff down. All three boys have AI things including celiac, Hashimotos including recently diagnosed Hashimotos encephalopathy, Asthma, allergies, colitis, possible sjogrens and a grandson with celiac disease.  Hubby and I have the AID and can't blame ourselves for what happens to our kids as the whole world is crazy now and I just read that 1 out of 11 people will be diagnosed with AID. All we can do is to help them learn how to work with the medical system to get results and to keep track of their health and know what the signs and symptoms of AID are. It is tough , that is for sure, but it is what it is and we can't change it or blame ourselves for something that we did not purposely cause. Good luck All. Irish

quietdynamics

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Re: How about my children's genetic predisposition?
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2014, 06:06:14 AM »
The advances in genetic research, the Genome Project and the grand push toward pro-active, meta-analysis to help define socio-environmental factors, demographics to understand disease in our times will hopefully supplant the psuedo-health brainwashing we have been bombarded with by large manufactures.

Certainly with the rapid rise of AI in industrial nations (and rise in countries adopting Western culture) there are correlations. Factors include behavioral shifts, but, also the introduction of our consumer products, etc.

Someone awhile ago had posted something I found interesting about MS, and a friend had just been Dx'd.  There is with MS the strong theory of EBV, and age of exposure, etc. 

"There is evidence that infection with the virus is associated with a higher risk of certain autoimmune diseases, especially dermatomyositis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome, and multiple sclerosis.
Infection with EBV occurs by the oral transfer of saliva and genital secretions.
Most people become infected with EBV and gain adaptive immunity. In the United States, about half of all five-year-old children and 90 to 95 percent of adults have evidence of previous infection. Infants become susceptible to EBV as soon as maternal antibody protection disappears. Many children become infected with EBV, and these infections usually cause no symptoms or are indistinguishable from the other mild, brief illnesses of childhood. In the United States and other developed countries, many people are not infected with EBV in their childhood years. When infection with EBV occurs during adolescence, it causes infectious mononucleosis 35 to 50 percent of the time." Wiki

*A number of studies I read noted infection with EBV at older ages (late teen, adulthood) was a concern with MS and autoimmune. Not with exposure at younger age.

"researchers believe vitamin D, which the body produces naturally when the skin is exposed to sunlight, may be involved. People who live closer to the equator are continually exposed to greater amounts of sunlight. As a result, they tend to have higher levels of naturally – produced vitamin D, which is thought to have a beneficial impact on immune function and may help protect against autoimmune disease, like MS."

During the "Great AIDS" scare sanitizers became a household, school, etc, stable. AIDS children are not in the news anymore, but, germ/virus phobia stayed. 
Skin Cancer.. slather children head to toe with sunscreen and do not allow the best vehicle for our bodies to get VitD.. skin absorption (even 10 mins, then apply sunscreen) 

All good products, but, is overdoing affecting the body from building natural immunity ( to a degree)?

So take the kids to the park, let them get dirty..lol
Mudpies are fun.
« Last Edit: April 05, 2014, 07:04:54 AM by quietdynamics »
Sjogrens ANA 1:640; SS-A/B+; Fibro; IBS; Neuro symptoms,Thyroid Anti-bodies; Ocular Rosacea, Livedo reticularis,

"You can't have a positive life with a  negative mind"

machenza

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Re: How about my children's genetic predisposition?
« Reply #7 on: April 06, 2014, 11:28:39 PM »
Quietdynamics,

I read the same study, and more like those, and have to agree. In many of the cases the onset of Sjogren is associated with an exposure to a virus. I do believe that there might be an actual agent that spins our immunities out of control. This agent is perhaps viral. Of course not one that we regularly test for, but not totally unknown either. By far, from what I learned, many people have a positive results form a anti-malaria drug. Isn?t that intriguing? If that drug can slow and even reverse some of the damage, perhaps it can kill the: agent: that activated the chain in the first place.

In my mind, it is viral, or a part of a virus gene, and it is, perhaps, something with similar traits of malaria gene-wise, other than that it would not respond to that medication, right?  Why is everybody looking to fix the most broken, not to stop and salvage us before we get there. Research is all about going back into one manifestation at a time, and not looking enough into what tweaks our immunity to go crazy?
I wish I had a lot of money to fund a research like that,
Nellie

1722Mich

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Re: How about my children's genetic predisposition?
« Reply #8 on: April 08, 2014, 11:01:54 AM »
Wondering....I actually asked my rheumy the same question.  He smiled and told me that my children will have a 20% higher chance than the general population of having an AID.  He send the tendency towards AID does seem to run in families but its a roll of the dice as to which one you get if any.  When my middle son started having some odd pains I asked them to check his ANA, RNA and sed rate.  The ANA came back positive.  I freaked out and scheduled him with my rheumy immediately.  He talked to my son at length and decided it was not anything related to autoimmune problems.  He said it is not unusual for kids whose parent has an AID to have positive test results but no symptoms.  His best advice for my son was to NEVER EVER smoke because that can increase his risk of later developing an AID.  No problem there since my son has asthma.  Still I worry.  Having Sjogrens really isn't pleasant and I certainly don't want to pass it along to my kids!

slccom

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Re: How about my children's genetic predisposition?
« Reply #9 on: April 08, 2014, 02:17:28 PM »
Every family passes down something. Your kids will benefit from improvements in treatments, too.

Sharon

lolo1979

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Re: How about my children's genetic predisposition?
« Reply #10 on: April 08, 2014, 02:38:07 PM »
^ This. I totally agree with Sharon on both points. I especially agree that our children will benefit from new, better medications and treatments. There are already several in the pipeline that are likely to help with Sjogrens and other AI diseases. 

We just happen to be the lucky ones who have this during the "dark ages" for autoimmune disease. I believe we are on the verge of better breakthroughs that make AI disease something less feared and more treatable.  Just based on my own research.