Author Topic: Losing my job  (Read 271 times)

SjoGirl

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Losing my job
« on: September 04, 2019, 10:30:34 AM »
Well, I knew it was coming. I've been in a PT job for 4 years and learned today that it will end as of next summer. That, fortunately, is a lot of lead time and gives me plenty of opportunity to decide what to do next.

I also consult PT and have been juggling these two roles. I could increase the consulting but it's pretty uneven as to income and knowing where the next gig will come from. It's that or find a FT job or work PT and consult or retire and consult.

Does anyone who has been down this road have any advice?
Raynauds, sero-negative RA, Primary SjS, osteopenia, degenerative disc disease, disc protrusions,stenosis, Carpal tunnel,  poly neuropathy, myoclonus, hiatal hernia, esophagitis, viral infection, Leukopenia. Restasis, Vitamin D, B12, Evoxac, Lanzoprezole, calcium acetaminophen.

vrystaat

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Re: Losing my job
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2019, 12:46:48 PM »
 I found little to no sympathy when the Polymyositis and Polyneuritis started getting worse. At first the pain killers helped, but as I grew clumsy and less together, my (previous) colleagues wanted me out. My job carried a big intellectual load, and the Sjogren's fog didn't help. My job entailed a lot of standing, and the neuropathic pain made this too difficult. Fortunately, I had Disability Insurance, but they only paid up after I sued them. I asked for accommodation at my work, but no way. All my former pals became enemies. I was also refused a 3 month medical leave of absence. So I had a forced retirement in my fifties. But I sued my former associates under the Americans with Disabilities Act, and won a fairly good settlement. But the human factors astounded and saddened me. Faith in other people did not work for me, and I have become very cynical.

My best advice is to retire as soon as you can, and Federal and/or State Disability helps a lot. My private Insurance was a godsend, but of course the Attorneys took 30% of it.

I hope things work out for you.
Sjogrens;Polymyositis;Polyneuropathy;Gastritis;GERD, Autonomic Neuropathy, Neurological complications, Trigeminal Neuralgia,Gamma 3 globulin low;Multiple infections;Brain fog; Ocular problems - blepharitis, scleritiis, dry eye,severe eye pain. Possible Inclusion body Myositis.Currently Endstage

Carolina

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Re: Losing my job
« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2019, 05:17:20 AM »
I'm so sorry, SjoGirl,

Our jobs involve so many factors: income, health insurance (only in America!), social identity, professional and personal satisfaction, to name a few.

I cannot imagine how you can work in such a physically demanding profession as Physical Therapy, SjoGirl!  You have always amazed me.

I have no advice, really.  I took early retirement at, 2000, at age 58 because I had developed major coronary artery disease, (caused by constant inflammation from my Chronic Systemic Inflammatory Disease), and had 3 angioplasties and two stents at age 57, as part of a year with six trips to the OR.  I was exhausted.

My job was very demanding, with an hour long commute each way.  When I retired (Professor of
Business) they hired 3 faculty members to replace me, all of whom complained about the workload!

I was able to retire early because I could have my husband's health insurance until Medicare covered me 7 years later.
 
And tho' I had a host of 'conditions' it wasn't until two years later, in 2002, that my descent into Hades that began with a corneal erosion due to what was diagnosed as Sjogren's by my Rheumatologist.

If I had had to work with the conditions that developed since 2002, well, I couldn't have.  I just cannot imagine it.

Our Immune Disorders rob us of health, peace of mind, income, and almost our identity!  And the pain and suffering I am experiencing right now and driving me to a very 'dark place'. 

Know that you are not alone, tho' sometimes it feels that way.

Keep us posted on this 'decision' as it unfolds. 

Love, Elaine
Female-Elaine,76-CVID-pSJS-IC-PN-CAD-Osteoarthritis-COPD-SFN-Knee/Shoulder Degeneration-SIBO-Intertrigo-Act.Purpura-Anemia-Copper Def-Raynaud's-Meniere's-Hiatal Hernia-Achalasia-IVIG Gamunex-Medrol-Gabapentin-Atenolol-Pilocarpine-LDN-Nasonex-Lipitor-Estrogel-B-12-Iron-D-Mannose-NAC-Co-Q10-D3-Omega 3

SjoGirl

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Re: Losing my job
« Reply #3 on: September 05, 2019, 03:24:51 PM »
Thanks so much these are helpful comments.

If I said I'm a physical therapist I better retire. I'm a parttime (PT) college level instructor and administrator and parttime (PT) consultant. I suspect it's the use of PT that led to the thinking that I'm a therapist (though sometimes I seem to be for my students).

My question is this, how did you counter the sense of loss of identity and what did you replace work with? I'm still intellectually curious and want to travel but I'm not sure reading or visiting cities will be enough for me.
Raynauds, sero-negative RA, Primary SjS, osteopenia, degenerative disc disease, disc protrusions,stenosis, Carpal tunnel,  poly neuropathy, myoclonus, hiatal hernia, esophagitis, viral infection, Leukopenia. Restasis, Vitamin D, B12, Evoxac, Lanzoprezole, calcium acetaminophen.

Carolina

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Re: Losing my job
« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2019, 07:48:00 AM »
Because my health deteriorated rather slowly after I retired and I did the following:

1. My French grandchildren visited us for 6 weeks every summer for 9 years, beginning at ages 7 and 5.  So I was a 'soccer grandma'.  We were able to give them a complete American childhood, a bilingual experience, and we had a lot of fun.  My husband continued to work full time.  This was an amazing experience and I felt very useful.

2.  I did volunteer work in the community, especially with our library system.  I was President of The Friends of the Library which host visits from authors, and raised money for the Summer Reading Program for the Children's Library.

3. I joined a very stimulating book group.  And a bridge club.  And a women's dinner group. and did political volunteer work.

4. My husband and I made our second trip to China, tho' by that time I was terribly anemic, so the trip was exhausting.  I planned the entire trip on the internet, bought the tickets, arranged hotels, side tours, etc.  My husband has an appointment at a Medical School in China and we spent a week there, as well.  We started in Shanghai and went to Xian (terra-cotta soldiers), as well.

5. We also travelled in the US, and moved to El Paso in 2006, to help our younger son with his young family.

After 2008 I began to become disabled by nerve damage from my Immune Disorder, and 11 years later I wear leg braces and walk with a walker.  Now I'm 77 .  I can't drive or even cook.

I see a therapist every week, and one issue for me is my 'identity'.  We define ourselves by work and family, but now I am facing how to deal with myself once those two are 'gone'.  My youngest grandchild is 12, the oldest is 25. 

Meditation helps me face myself without outside sources of identity. 

Regards, Elaine
Female-Elaine,76-CVID-pSJS-IC-PN-CAD-Osteoarthritis-COPD-SFN-Knee/Shoulder Degeneration-SIBO-Intertrigo-Act.Purpura-Anemia-Copper Def-Raynaud's-Meniere's-Hiatal Hernia-Achalasia-IVIG Gamunex-Medrol-Gabapentin-Atenolol-Pilocarpine-LDN-Nasonex-Lipitor-Estrogel-B-12-Iron-D-Mannose-NAC-Co-Q10-D3-Omega 3

katie1111

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Re: Losing my job
« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2019, 08:31:02 AM »
Chronic illness certainly changes your identity.  I was never ill, never worried about energy levels etc.  It was not a matter of losing my identity, but changing it.  Concentrating on things I could do rather than things I couldn't.  Yes, I have changed since I retired and I like the new me.  I still don't like my limitations, but I do like the new things I do.  I travel a lot and I volunteer.  I also read.  I am thankful for the life I had before, but even more thankful for the new opportunities I have now.  Keep your eyes open - there is a world full of opportunities awaiting.

Katie1111

SjoGirl

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Re: Losing my job
« Reply #6 on: September 06, 2019, 10:43:13 AM »
Thanks all, these are comforting and helpful thoughts.

You are amazing women, thanks for sharing your stories and wisdom with me!
Raynauds, sero-negative RA, Primary SjS, osteopenia, degenerative disc disease, disc protrusions,stenosis, Carpal tunnel,  poly neuropathy, myoclonus, hiatal hernia, esophagitis, viral infection, Leukopenia. Restasis, Vitamin D, B12, Evoxac, Lanzoprezole, calcium acetaminophen.

Kathy57

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Re: Losing my job
« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2019, 12:18:57 AM »
Sjogirl,

Where do I begin?  I am going through some big changes and just trying to roll with the punches.  Right after Thanksgiving of last year, we were told that all the nurses in my department would be let go and that our last day would be in early February.  We were to be replaced with non licensed people.  So basically we all knew before Christmas that we would lose our jobs.  Such a wonderful gift🥺.

Most of us applied for other jobs Within the hospital and obtained them.  I had been working part time and was totally uninterested in working full time anywhere!  To be perfectly honest, I don?t think I had it left in me with my Sjogrens issues.  I received severance pay and also received a nice bonus for helping to train our replacements. 

I had and still have opportunities to apply for various part time jobs but...........................
I just couldn?t bring myself to finish even one of the applications.  My heart just wasn?t in it and this is hard because my identity for years has been tied to my work and my nice paycheck. 

I have slowly come to the conclusion that I don?t feel up to the work anymore.  It took so much out of me that I came home with nothing left.  Nursing can be very challenging and stressful, but also very rewarding.  I?m 61 and very soon to be 62.  I?m in a good position because I don?t have to work.  It wasn?t always like this for me, but our kids are all grown and gone and doing very well.  Our House is paid for and no real debt.  I?m collecting 2 small pensions from previous employment and I plan on collecting my social security early.  I?m lucky that I have my husband?s good health insurance.  He also has an excellent pension and we?ve done a good job of saving for retirement.

My husband has cancer and some may remember me mentioning this.  My attitude is different.  I don?t know how much time we have left.  I?d rather spend it with him and our grandkids, traveling, and just trying to fully live each day.  This looks like an easy and no brainer decision but I am still trying to adjust to it.  I have an Iowa and Illinois Nursing license.  I?ve just made the decision to let my Iowa license go inactive.  It still feels so odd doing this. 

We are now able to spend more time enjoying our grandkids which involves some traveling, but we?ve got the time now to travel!  My husband loves spending time visiting and babysitting the little ones.  We babysat two of our grandkids for 16 days while their parents went to Japan.  We had a blast but we were tired, too!  But it was a good tired.

I wish you luck as you navigate your future.  Remember that you have choices and can always change your mind or your path if you need to.

Kathy
Diagnosed Sjogrens Aug. 1st 2014.  Plaqinil, Evoxac, Prevacid, Lexapro, Hypothyroid, Esophagel Reflux, Gastritis, Barretts Esophagus, failed sinus surgery with 3 nasal septal perforations.  (Can't see it from the outside)  Asthma, albuterol, Dulera, Nebulizer, Osteoporosis.