Author Topic: H1N1 vaccination in Sjögren's syndrome - study  (Read 461 times)

eija

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H1N1 vaccination in Sjögren's syndrome - study
« on: November 07, 2018, 06:24:16 PM »
I saw this study from last year and wonder if anyone has any wise comments about it? My brain fog is so bad at the moment it's difficult for me to read anything - much less some scientific text in English. But do I read this right: Since my SJS is untreated (I'm not on Plaquenil or anything for it) I should be cautious about getting the flu vaccine?

H1N1 vaccination in Sjögren's syndrome triggers polyclonal B cell activation and promotes autoantibody production

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/28760805/?fbclid=IwAR3CJ_IcQGbXqrrcuGN2k7qZBxF1aNLbMRHigktc_2wUShIOIuiKlBG8BFs


(edited to increase font size)
« Last Edit: November 08, 2018, 02:24:00 AM by Linda196 »
Female, 51, in Finland
Sjögren's, fibromyalgia, hypothyroidism (Hashi?), depression, migraines, pressure urticaria, progressing Raynaud's, MCS...
Cymbalta, Tyroxin, Esomeprazole, Oftagel drops

irish

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Re: H1N1 vaccination in Sjögren's syndrome - study
« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2018, 11:49:24 PM »
I am not alert enough to understand all that is in the info. All I can tell you is that   I was not diagnosed or on any meds for almost 40 years and during that time my health was not the best. I started getting the flu shot at least 10 years without any problems. I worked in the health care industry and had so many infections. My patients had a large amount of flu and I began to be concerned that I could get very ill if I didn't get the vaccine. Have you talked this over with a doctor.

I have to admit that I would think that even with an educated study this would be a very hard issue to pin down. Everybody is so different in their autoimmune and immune response that I would think it would still be an educated quess with the testing. Just my opinion. Irish

eija

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Re: H1N1 vaccination in Sjögren's syndrome - study
« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2018, 08:36:33 PM »
Thank you Irish,


Me too having porridge in place of brain cells. Horrible trying to read something and not understand a word... :-\


This study was interesting to me, because I'm quite convinced that the first "pandemic" vaccination of swine flu (was it 2009 maybe?) was the thing to trigger my Sjögren's. I was diagnosed in 2012, but two weeks after that vaccine I started getting strong unwanted symptoms, like horrible fatigue. Only part of it was explained with my Hashimoto - and depression which I didn't feel I had at the time.


In Finland that particular vaccination got a lot of attention, because several young people came down with narcolepsy, and it was confirmed later that the vaccination was to blame for that. Actually before I read those news I studied narcolepsy because I wondered if I had had it, the exhaustion was so profound. I was too afraid to even drive to work (15 mins) because I couldn't stay awake properly all that way.


I was on hydroxychloroquine for about 1,5 years after my diagnosis, since then I've had nothing. And no, I haven't discussed this with a doctor since I don't have one. Right now I'm having a nasty head cold so getting a vaccination is out of question anyway. I'll probably skip it alltogether.


What interests me is the "B-cell activation" they mention in that study. What is that? What are B-cells?



Female, 51, in Finland
Sjögren's, fibromyalgia, hypothyroidism (Hashi?), depression, migraines, pressure urticaria, progressing Raynaud's, MCS...
Cymbalta, Tyroxin, Esomeprazole, Oftagel drops

jazzlover

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Re: H1N1 vaccination in Sjögren's syndrome - study
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2018, 09:13:22 PM »
I was wondering the same thing about the B-cells.

At any rate, I do NOT get vaccinations anymore. Too big a risk. I also have Mast Cell Activation Syndrome besides the SJS.
Mast Cell Activation Syndrome (MCAS), Salicylate Sensitivity,  Interstitial Cystitis,  gluten intolerance, Raynaud's, Sjogren's, A-fib; cytomegalovirus, recovered from Lyme disease

Carolina

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Re: H1N1 vaccination in Sjögren's syndrome - study
« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2018, 09:32:41 PM »
My immunologist recommends the flu vaccination every year.   Since my Immune Disorder is not of the autoantibody type, there may be no reason for me to avoid the vaccination..

However, I have had the pneumonia vaccine (23 strains) 3 times, and each time I fail to develop immunity to almost all of the strains.  So I always wonder if the flu vaccine actually 'takes' for me.

Since I never get sick now (I do have flares unfortunately, but those aren't infections), I just assume the flu shot is helping me.  Before I began regular IVIG (every four weeks), I had constant infections, some fungal infections as well as bacterial and viral infections.

Regards, Elaine
« Last Edit: November 19, 2018, 04:39:31 PM by Carolina »
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vniskasa

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Re: H1N1 vaccination in Sjögren's syndrome - study
« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2018, 09:35:09 AM »
B-cells are a part of the adaptive immunity, they are responsible for the humoral or antibody mediated immunity. B-cells (mainly plasma cells) produce antibodies or immunoglobulins against pathogenic bacteria and viruses for example. Antibodies bind to the pathogen and mark it for destruction by other cells or can in some cases directly neutralize it.

Bacteria and viruses (pathogens) etc contain structures called antibodies which can be recognized by immune cells and when recognized initiate an immune response. Antigens can be certain proteins, polysaccharides or lipids on the pathogen. B-cell or T-cell (cell mediated immunity) is specific for one antigen meaning it recognizes and reacts against a certain pathogen. Cells that haven't recognized an antigen and have not been activated are called naive B- or T-cells. Normally, upon antigen recognition and activation, cells that are specific for the pathogen undergo clonal expansion (they divide) and differentiate into effector cells (effector cell has a function like plasma cells produce antibodies) and memory cells (faster immune response in repeated exposure) meaning that all the cells that divide are specific for the pathogen that is causing the immune response. In the case of B-cells, they proliferate and then differentiate to plasma cells which produce antibodies against the pathogen.

Polyclonal activation can mean nonspecific activation of numerous different B-cells, not just one cell clone against one antigen. It can also be a normal reaction if different B-cells recognize different or overlapping antibodies on the same pathogen. Autoantibodies are antibodies directed against own cells.

Kinda hard to explain but I hope you can understand it.

« Last Edit: November 19, 2018, 09:46:35 AM by vniskasa »