Author Topic: Nightshade vegetables  (Read 2481 times)

Winnie

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Nightshade vegetables
« on: April 26, 2012, 07:28:55 PM »
My gastro wants me to do a food journal along with current stressors in my life.  All summer long, I was extremely fatigued and had mild but sharp pain in my hands and feet.   Which now the pain comes and goes, but I am on plaquenil also.  I was then, gluten free and eating baked potatoes when I didn't want to cook.  I know that nightshade vegetables may cause inflammation and was wondering if anyone has seen a correlation between symptoms and eating nightshade vegetables?


Winnie
Sicca Syndrome-Aug 11', osteopenia, IBS-C, gastritis, GERD
Plaquenil, Dexilant, Vit D, Calcium, gluten free, dairy, egg & nut intolerances

stephL

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Re: Nightshade vegetables
« Reply #1 on: April 27, 2012, 09:48:15 AM »
Hey Winnie,

Thanks for this topic. It prompted me to do some reading on Night Shade, both the plants and vegetables. The non-edible plants apparently have powerful substances which provide us with many medications.

"Despite the extreme toxicity of the tropanes, they are useful drugs when administered in extremely small dosages. They can reverse cholinergic poisoning, which can be caused by overexposure to pesticides and chemical warfare agents such as sarin and VX. More commonly, they can halt many types of allergic reactions. Atropine, a commonly used ophthalmological agent, dilates the pupils and thus facilitates examination of the interior of the eye. Scopolamine is used as an antiemetic against motion sickness or for people receiving chemotherapy. Atropine has a stimulant effect on the central nervous system and heart, whereas scopolamine has a sedative effect."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solanaceae

Of personal interest to me is that I once had an allergic reaction to  Hyoscyamine, which I just discovered is a substance found in the  the inedible Night Shade plants.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyoscyamine

I will keep on reading, and I'm inspired by the idea of keeping a journal to try to sort out whether or not I am affected by potatoes, tomatoes, eggplant, peppers, and I guess tobacco too.

Thanks!  :D
"Unlike weakness, fatigue can be alleviated by periods of rest." -Wikipedia: Fatigue (medical)

Skylar

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Re: Nightshade vegetables
« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2012, 12:49:22 PM »
Winnie, if you look through the peer reviewed, medical/nutritional journals you'll find lots of conflicting information about this. IOW for some people the nightshade family causes problems but for others, like myself, they can eat them without any problems. I eat plenty of nightshade veggies including potatoes, tomatoes (tons of those daily, love them), eggplant, peppers etc. I know that Dr. John McDougall, as part of his elimination diet also suggests citrus fruit and gluten (wheat etc.) as potential problem foods to test.

The way to really know if it affects you personally is to do an elimination diet where you eat a very limited amount of foods least likely to cause problems and keep a diary. You add a new food only every couple of days, watching to see if you have a reaction before adding something new again. It's commonly suggested by pediatricians when young children have problems. It can clearly pinpoint those foods that truly cause problems as you eliminate any possible confusion that can occur when eating lots of different foods.

Or you can avoid all of them and see if that makes a difference - you won't know until you try and it certainly is worth trying to see if it helps.

iraisin

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Re: Nightshade vegetables
« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2012, 01:01:42 PM »
I concur with Skylar. Food is chemistry, our bodies are chemistry and on top of that unique to ourselves. Basically, it's all greek until you dive in and start discovering. The journal will help too. I even created a historical chart of my symptoms and life modifications from birth to present. That too helped me discover things about myself.

One thing is for sure about this Sjogren's stuff - you HAVE to become VERY selfaware. I'm not as good at it as others - so I resort to journaling and charting.

prunella

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Re: Nightshade vegetables
« Reply #4 on: April 27, 2012, 05:01:48 PM »
Journaling and charting is a noble pursuit.  Would it be easier to create a spread sheet so you could check off foods as you eat them?--rather than listing them and later looking for patterns.

I always seem to forget to include some ingredients. The whole process is is tedious!   My pcp actually said that journaling is very hard to do accurately. I felt like she excused me from that homework assignment.

be well,
beth
Age 61; Blood type 0-; Sjogren's Dx 2005, sero-negative; plaquenil, 200-400mg/day; lunesta; vivelle dot; omega3, 4gm/day; CoQ10;  vit D3. Wheat free; dairy free. Homeopathy and acupuncture help enormously.

jazzlover

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Re: Nightshade vegetables
« Reply #5 on: April 27, 2012, 06:20:13 PM »
steph said .."Of personal interest to me is that I once had an allergic reaction to  Hyoscyamine, which I just discovered is a substance found in the  the inedible Night Shade plants."

oh great! and I've been taking this lately!

What I did was eliminate all night shades for 4-6 wks to see if my pain issues got better. I think they did. Now I avoid night shades but eat potatoes once in awhile. You wouldn't feel any better if eliminating just ONE night shade food.

I usually eat sweet potatoes instead of white potatoes.

Interstitial Cystitis,  gluten intolerance, Raynaud's, Sjogren's, A-fib, neuropathy, plantar fasciitis

iraisin

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Re: Nightshade vegetables
« Reply #6 on: April 27, 2012, 09:55:02 PM »
The speadsheet is a great idea. I'll add that to my regular journal. I also track my workload and life events, like my dog's cancer diagnosis. All these things effect my flares and if not a full-blown flare, my fatigue levels. It all seems to add up. It's not just the food, it's the weather, the stress, the activities... I am trying to learn how it all matters to my body.

Belsey1

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Re: Nightshade vegetables
« Reply #7 on: April 28, 2012, 02:46:46 AM »
When I was diagnosed with Fibro and CFIDS in 1990, my doctor then (sure wish he was still around) told me to stay away from all nightshade foods, especially tomatoes.  I followed his suggestion for quite some time and feel it did help.  However, I eventually went back to eating them, especially tomatoes.  He moved out of state and then I had no one to hold me accountable...something I was not able to do myself.
55 year old female, diagnosed with SJS in 2010...Fibro in 1990, sleep apnea with C pap-Restless Leg Syndrome.  Recently added Diabetes and high blood pressure...have anxiety disorder, depression and PTSD.  Chloroquine, Clonazapam, Lexapro, Januvia, Metformin, Losartan, Diclofenac, Gabapentin.

Winnie

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Re: Nightshade vegetables
« Reply #8 on: April 28, 2012, 07:32:27 AM »
Thanks, I really don't eat many nightshade vegetables, but since I have a limited diet, I would hate to take out potatoes.  I am hungry - starving, mainly in the mornings and can't eat anything of substance that satisfies my hunger.  I don't like tomatoes, peppers are bad for acid reflux and never have tried egg plant.  Have you ever had a baked potatoe without butter, sour cream or cheese?   ??? So now I grill them on George Foreman and eat them with ketsup.  I am tracking potatoes and I should know soon. 

Skylar - Have you went on a McDougall trip?  Have you met him?  I would love for him to be my doctor, but I feel like my case is more complicated than what he treats and I am not willing to give up meat at this time.

Winnie
Sicca Syndrome-Aug 11', osteopenia, IBS-C, gastritis, GERD
Plaquenil, Dexilant, Vit D, Calcium, gluten free, dairy, egg & nut intolerances

Skylar

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Re: Nightshade vegetables
« Reply #9 on: April 28, 2012, 09:14:21 AM »
Skylar - Have you went on a McDougall trip?  Have you met him?  I would love for him to be my doctor, but I feel like my case is more complicated than what he treats and I am not willing to give up meat at this time.

Winnie
No I would love to one day but those trips are very expensive. I too would like him to be my doctor and I did email him when I had a health issue a few years ago and he emailed me back with medical journal articles appropriate for my problem and I gave them to my PCP as well as reviewed them with my DH and it made a real impact on treatment for the better. I do think, though the years he probably has treated some complicated patients. I think many people go to his clinic as a sort of last hope. He does have concerns about autoimmune disease and treatment and chronic illness in general- although his research is in Multiple Sclerosis and Rheumatoid Arthritis, not Sjogren's per se. I do think he would want you to give up the meat - but I understand sometimes it's hard to do. When I found his diet, I was really sick, so many health issues, so much pain, could barely move, fighting getting permanently stuck in a wheelchair I was desperate to try anything, including giving up foods I loved or was addicted to. In my case, clearly there was something in the animal products/ extracted oils/junk food that was making me so ill - don't know what it was, but I'm not going to go back to eating that stuff to figure it out. I'm sorry and hope that potatoes are not a problem for you - that would be awful. Have you tried sweet potatoes instead? They are not part of the nightshade family.

jazzlover

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Re: Nightshade vegetables
« Reply #10 on: April 28, 2012, 12:52:53 PM »
Have you ever had a baked potato without butter, sour cream or cheese?   
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Yes, sorta!! I use dairy free Smart Balance spread on my sweet potatoes.
Interstitial Cystitis,  gluten intolerance, Raynaud's, Sjogren's, A-fib, neuropathy, plantar fasciitis

Winnie

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Re: Nightshade vegetables
« Reply #11 on: April 28, 2012, 06:54:31 PM »
Skylar - Yes I alter between sweet potatoes, potatoes, rice, quinoa and rice noodles.  Last year, I also e-mailed Dr. McDougall and he responded.  :)  I don't want to give up meat because my family butchers our own beef and pork, so we kill it, cut it up and package it.  Pure meat, no additives.  I only buy chicken and ham.  My husband and boys hunt, so we also get deer. 

Jazzlover - I buy Smart Balance too, but it is not the same.  I can't get used to the change yet.  I am eating daiya cheese.  It is tolerable.  I bought soy yogurt and some sort of soy sour cream and had to throw both of them away.  Yuck.  Back to the basics...

Winnie
Sicca Syndrome-Aug 11', osteopenia, IBS-C, gastritis, GERD
Plaquenil, Dexilant, Vit D, Calcium, gluten free, dairy, egg & nut intolerances

susanep

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Re: Nightshade vegetables
« Reply #12 on: April 28, 2012, 09:09:35 PM »
I love my sweet potatoes, and I had my first home grown green onions tonight. yummy!

susanep :)
Sjogren's, Lupus, Hypothyroid, Fibro, Sleep Apnea, diabetes, asthma, Polycystic ovaries, and Gerd. Meds - Pilocarpine, Synthroid, Effexor, Cpap, aspirin, Prilosec, Neurontin, Xanax, eye Drops, vitamin D3, Plaquenil, Gabapentin, Provigil , Advair, Proventil- Retired Teacher/Disabled

Suzie

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Re: Nightshade vegetables
« Reply #13 on: April 29, 2012, 01:08:30 AM »
Baked potatoes are great with humous! Try it!

prunella

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Re: Nightshade vegetables
« Reply #14 on: April 29, 2012, 01:44:55 PM »
I cannot imagine my life without the nightshades.  I truly love tomatoes and eggplant.
Have been mostly vegetarian for about 40 years, vegan for several months, until a few weeks ago when naturopath urged me to eat meat. 

The nightshades are my comfort food!

Winnie, is it possible that organic meat is healthier for AI than industry products?  Maybe? I am guessing that you control what those animals eat. No weird growth hormones.

BTW, I have no idea how to effectively create an excell-type spread sheet. It's one of those skills I keep meaning to acquire.  ;D

I am beginning to think I will have to resort to a cardboard diet.  Perhaps parsley on corrugated as a main course?

be well,
beth
Age 61; Blood type 0-; Sjogren's Dx 2005, sero-negative; plaquenil, 200-400mg/day; lunesta; vivelle dot; omega3, 4gm/day; CoQ10;  vit D3. Wheat free; dairy free. Homeopathy and acupuncture help enormously.