Author Topic: Yet another bad tooth  (Read 4925 times)

Jenny

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Yet another bad tooth
« on: December 01, 2011, 05:01:07 AM »
I went for my cleaning yesterday and  although my gums look great, I have a cavity under a molar crown. That's my third in a little over a half a year. Had to have the first two pulled. Luckily they were back molars. Another $1000 down the drain. Darn Sjogrens!
63 year old female with back, shoulder, neck and knee pain, dry mouth, losing teeth, dry sinuses,Blood test positive for Sjogrens. Fibromyalgia, Osteoarthritis .
Maloxicam, Lisinopril, Norco, misc.vitamins
4 discs in low back fused. Shoulder replaced 2015 & 2017 Need knee replaced.
4 hand surgeries

Jellyb

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Re: Yet another bad tooth
« Reply #1 on: December 01, 2011, 05:53:04 AM »
Oh Jenny, I am so sorry about your tooth. I had a bout with cavities last spring ( 5 new ones)  I cried I was so upset, and scared. I dont have dental insurance either, so I feel your pain about the cost.

I am sending good tooth karma your way.

Joe S.

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Re: Yet another bad tooth
« Reply #2 on: December 01, 2011, 07:13:19 AM »
I am not looking forward to my cleaning in the middle of the month. It seems that there may be a number of cavities, crowns or partials in my future.
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A66eyroad

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Re: Yet another bad tooth
« Reply #3 on: December 01, 2011, 07:18:52 AM »
Tooth Fairy!  Where are you when we need you?   :P
Female, 61
Sjogrens, UCTD, and subacute cutaneous lupus. Flu-like symptoms, mouth & nasal ulcers, itchy rash, high cholesterol, headache, earache, tinnitis, dizziness. Hangover-like nausea, especially in the a.m.
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Carolina

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Re: Yet another bad tooth
« Reply #4 on: December 01, 2011, 08:38:44 AM »
0h dear, Jenny, I always fear for my teeth.

I have only 28, as my wisdom teeth were extracted when I was 16.

No wonder I'm so slow at figuring things out!

Anyway, half my teeth are crowned or have inlays or onlays (I don't know the difference either), with lots of posts and root canals.   These are all molars.

The other 14 have never had a cavity!

I have had the problem of abscesses under crowns, with a root canals done through the crown, and cavities below the edge of a crown, too. 

The issue of dental care and the lack of affordable care for all makes me so angry, I can barely type.  I have done everything I can to support national medical and dental care for all.  It amazes me, too, that countries that have national healthcare do NOT have national dental care too!   Your mouth is a key part of your health.  I guess they want everyone in dentures!

I have been lucky to have had dental insurance all my adult life, and since I've had my Sicca (dry mouth and eyes), I've had my teeth clean three times a year instead of two.

My heart goes out to you.  I know life isn't fair, but I do wish it could be a little bit more supportive.

Hugs

Elaine

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Jenny

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Re: Yet another bad tooth
« Reply #5 on: December 01, 2011, 05:37:11 PM »
My dental hygienist did me a favor and gave me a free Floride treatment. She also recommended that I use Act mouthwash a couple of times a week which has Floride. I went to Walmart today and found one specifically for dry mouths!  I hope it helps. At least it tastes a lot better than most of them.
63 year old female with back, shoulder, neck and knee pain, dry mouth, losing teeth, dry sinuses,Blood test positive for Sjogrens. Fibromyalgia, Osteoarthritis .
Maloxicam, Lisinopril, Norco, misc.vitamins
4 discs in low back fused. Shoulder replaced 2015 & 2017 Need knee replaced.
4 hand surgeries

irish

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Re: Yet another bad tooth
« Reply #6 on: December 01, 2011, 09:33:26 PM »
I have had the teeth issues since I was a kid. I remember having 11 cavities when I was about 12 years old and often wonder if I was having sicca way back then. I know that I had bad teeth for so many years and then it sort of quieted down for a few years. The year before I had my teeth pulled I had 8 cavities in January and in November I had 17 cavities and I would not let the dentist fix anything but one that would be dangerous to my health. I was through with fixing them.

The teeth really started to deteriorate in the mid 80's and I had more asbscesses than I could shake a stick at. My calender always had several visits to the dentist(if not more) pretty much every month of the year. I spent so much money and I just kept on going and doing what I could.

I tried to get them to pull my teeth for years and all I got was a hassle from the dentists---the runaround. They want you to spend money with them plus they are scared stiff that once they pull your teeth you may get mad and sue them.

I had about 16 of my own teeth around the time that I finally got them to pull them. I went for almost 1 year without my bottom 4 front teeth. They were so painful that my new dentist finally pulled them and just waited to see if all that pain would go away. It took a long time. I think it was related to nerve pain and old infections.

The best thing I ever did for myself was to get my teeth pulled. Life became my own again. It takes a lot out of a person physically and financially when you suffer with rotten teeth. Having dentures is not a big deal in my book but having infections that might go to my brain really gets my attention. Also, I don't miss paying out all that money to the dentist anymore either. Irish ;D

Corella

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Re: Yet another bad tooth
« Reply #7 on: December 01, 2011, 10:32:20 PM »
Can I ask, does everyone with this illness lose their teeth, is there anything that can be done?  I floss each time after eating, I use a flouride mouthwash 3 times a day, brush my teeth three times a day and see a dentist every 3 months.

Is there anything else I can be doing? :'(

slccom

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Re: Yet another bad tooth
« Reply #8 on: December 01, 2011, 11:02:32 PM »
Marry a dentist?  :)

soycoffee

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Re: Yet another bad tooth
« Reply #9 on: December 02, 2011, 12:27:20 AM »
Marry a dentist?  :)
Laughing out loud, almost rolling on the floor at the timing in the thread.

Is losing one's teeth inevitable with this disease? I always had good teeth, and regular checkups that found one or two small cavities a year. I didn't floss, I did brush. In October of 1996 I was on a fellowship and had dental coverage. I saw a dentist who took xrays, and found the expected few small cavities, which he filled. Then he sold me on teeth whitening. (The fellowship was in Los Angeles, home of the brilliant white smile.) Five months later I had some toothpain, the first dentist had moved somewhere else, and I went to another. She found that my mouth was riddled with decay, and that I would need not just a few root canals, but a fully reconstructed mouth. Saw her a couple of times more for damage control.

Went back to my home university and tried to find someone who would see me without a big bill I could not afford. Got a couple of more of the worst teeth fixed, and was referred to the Dental School here. The original gang that couldn't shoot straight! They botched my care between student and supervisor. Then my student (who had it right) moved on, and then there was a new student and supervisor, who had a more radical plan, but little work was getting done. Then there was summer vacation. The I objected to the Dean's office of the Dental School. I got assigned just to a supervisor. The first supervisor saw me a couple of times and objected that I bled too much. The second supervisor saw me a couple of times and said that my mouth was too small -- not that his hands were too big! At that point, I went back to the Dean's office and said emphatically, Get me a solution, NOW, or I sue! Well, I was referred to the "Faculty Practice," and a dentist with small hands who had no trouble with my bleeding too much.

By that time, all my upper teeth had to be pulled, and I got an upper denture. I also was getting root canals in most of my lower teeth.

Finished that in about 2001. In 2005 I was back with pain in my lower teeth, and eventually all but six teeth were pulled, and the front teeth had root canal to within an inch of their lives, and the same hero dentist made a denture that anchored on those salvaged front teeth.

Now the first part of the treatment, the upper denture, was paid for courtesy of the dental school. The second part was not, and I paid very slowly when I could, and then couldn't.

Now, I cannot pay at all. And neither the Faculty Practice nor the Dental School will see me.
 
BUT By the time I had found my miracle working dentist of the small hands, I now learn, there was a new medical treatment for dry mouth. This same dentists KNEW I had dry mouth, knew my history. And I've paid him about $10,000 over the years. And now he (his practice manager) won't see me, because I still owe $2,000. And yet he NEVER mentioned that there was now a treatment for dry mouth, or that dry mouth could be treated in certain specific ways.

I wish, of course, I had pursued a formal diagnosis of Sjögren's when my mouth went south, in 1996.

I also think that my hero dentist should and could have started me on Salagen (pilocarpine) to prevent further deterioration. And that that is negligence on his part.

So, the lesson is, pursue a dx of Sjögren's diligently, and find dentists who understand what it is. Work with dentist and doctor to treat dry mouth and do all the necessary dental preventive stuff, that I was never taught to do. Insist that they tell you again what you need to do to prevent the problems. Tell them that you are not doing a, or b, or c, because your mouth hurts. Tell them again.

If I had married a dentist, we'd be divorced by now!

Soycoffee

Daisy1234

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Re: Yet another bad tooth
« Reply #10 on: December 02, 2011, 07:03:03 AM »
Corella:

I've been able to significantly slow the progression of Sjs on my teeth thru improved dental hygiene.  I have severe primary Sjs and produce NO saliva. 

My dental hygenist says that there is so little plaque on my teeth that there is not much work to be done, but as the cleaning is the way to keep an eye on things, I still have them 3 times a year.

The first thing I would recommend to persons with Sjs is to get a good Waterpik Water Flosser (it doesn't have to be name brand but the plug in ones are better than the cordless models and much stronger pressure) and use it twice a day, everyday.  This is WAY better than just regular flossing and brushing.  It also promotes very healthy gums and really destroys plaque.

I personally use Pro-enamel toothpaste as it builds up the tooth enamel that is worn down by acid wear and erosion (which Sjs patients suffer from).  You can also chew Xylitol mints to help build up tooth enamel if that is a problem issue for you.

Additionally, I use a Braun Oral-B electric toothbrush that vibrates and spins and does a great job on cleaning my teeth.  Yes, these things do cost money, but they save thousands in dental expenses and tooth extractions/root canal, cavities etc...)  I also use a floride mouth rinse last thing before going to bed for the night after I waterpik and brush my teeth. 

If you do just one thing different, I would strongly suggest getting the Waterpik Water Flosser.  That should make a huge improvement if you use it morning and night. 

Best of luck,
Daisy

Meld256

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Re: Yet another bad tooth
« Reply #11 on: December 02, 2011, 09:11:24 AM »
Jenny

Yes, the dental cost and aggravation with Sjogren's can have a huge effect on us.  I'm glad you got a free floride treatment.  It sounds like you are doing all you can for the health of your teeth.  Hope there's not too many more problems for you.

Corella,

In my opinion, it doesn't seem that it's a "given" that we all would lose our teeth. Many of us have kept them for many years with the right treatment and keeping up with the dentist visits. Some of us have lost them.  Mine in particular were deteriorating at the same time I was getting diagnosed.  If I had known what was causing it, I may have been able to keep more of them.

That said, Daisy has a lot of good info. about how to ward off further problems.  It takes some real diligence, but it is well worth it.  I know it's hard not to worry, but we just must do the best we can.
Take care,
Melinda

Maria3667

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Re: Yet another bad tooth
« Reply #12 on: December 02, 2011, 02:18:55 PM »
@Jenny,

Me too being forever plagued by teeth troubles...
However what my dentist 'forgot' to tell me is, when Zinc lozenges are taken on a regular basis, tooth infections dramatically decrease...

I've been taking it for the last 5 years... Never had another infection again... Whenever I feel a low grade tooth ache come up, I immediately start supplementing with Zinc lozenges (don't take on empty stomach - you'll be sick)... and so far it works! Mind you, it has to be a zinc lozenge (maybe so it's absorbed through mucous membranes) - the other ones don't help.

Strength to you!

52. DES-daughter ('67), Lyme's ('98), GAD ('98), Sjogren's ('02), hypothyroid ('04), endometriosis ('14), osteoarthritis ('16), blepharitis ('18), frozen shoulder ('19). Meds: pilocarpine, thyroid meds, 25mg quetiapine, 1% testosterone. Allergies: nickle, methylisothiazolinone, latex

irish

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Re: Yet another bad tooth
« Reply #13 on: December 02, 2011, 10:02:40 PM »
Basically, the reason Sjoggies get those cavities is because of the change in the way the body produces the saliva. Our saliva is filled with different enzymes and proteins that destroy bacteria in our mouth. The bacteria are what cause the cavities.

When we get Sjogrens our mucus gets thick, less and the quality of the mucus being produced is not good enough to kill of the bacteria like it once did. I brushed and did all the right stuff. I think that are all different in how the sjogrens affects us and our teeth.

I didn't know that I had low t-cells until after I had all my teeth pulled. No wonder I had so many infections that went on and on. It was like get cavity, go to dentist, need root canal, get infection, need antibiotic, need tooth removed. THat is the way it went much of the time.

Unfortunately, I thought my new dentist was good and I thought my previous dentist was good. I found out the hard way that they were both dumb. I got a new dentist who knew something was not right with me and agreed to work with me and tried different things---eventually pulling many teeth. However, he always gave me the speel about why it was good to keep your own teeth.

He did this almost up to the moment he injected the novacaine. I think all the dentists are bloody scared to death of getting sued. I was getting to the point where I was ready to tell him that I would sue him if he didn't pull my teeth. Why, oh why, do all dentists and many dentists patients think that having teeth pulled is so horrible. Guess I don't get it. Irish  ;D

AnaGamble

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Re: Yet another bad tooth
« Reply #14 on: December 03, 2011, 03:53:39 PM »
I am scared as h--l about losing my teeth's, been one of few things I've felt proud about in my life.
When I moved in with my BF I started using his Oral-B electric toothbrush and we recently bought one of those water flossers.
My teeth's are just way too tight for regular floss to get in between them without the floss getting stuck.  :-\
I try to use it every night but really hard getting used to a long and longer nightly routine before bed.
Feels like I'll eventually have to start getting ready for going to bed around 21.00 if I want to be done by 24.00.  :o
27 now so hope I can keep them for another 13 years at least.  :'(